Free of Malice National Book Tour 2017 – Liz Lazarus

Liz Lazarus Free of Malice National Book Tour Spring 2017

We’re taking Free of Malice on the road for a series of book events. Join me in a city near you!

Date City Details
March 12 Florence, MS Thank you
March 31 Raymond, MS Event information
April 1 Naples, FL Contact host
April 4 Saint Peters, MO Contact host
April 5 Evansville, IN Contact host
April 6 Haubstadt, IN Contact host
April 21 South Jordan, UT Event information
May 8 La Porte, IN
May 9 Fort Wayne, IN
May 10 Anderson, IN
May 15 Columbus, OH Event information
May 20 Johns Creek, GA Contact host
June 8 Des Moines, IA
June 9 Brooklyn, MI
July 8 Springfield, MO
July 21 Orange County, NY
August 5 Ona, WV
September 9 Sacramento, CA
October 16 Central Maryland
October 17 Lancaster, PA

More event details coming soon. To schedule: Texas, South Carolina and maybe even Alaska!

If you are interested in hosting a Free of Malice book event or signing, please contact me at liz [at ] lizlazarus [dot] com .

See you soon,

Liz

 

Building Communities with Little Free Library

During a walk in my neighborhood, I noticed that one of my neighbors had installed a Little Free Library in their yard. This delightful mini-library-on-a-post is a welcome addition to our block. I stepped forward and opened the clear Plexiglas door to take a closer peek at the books inside. There was a range of titles from children’s books to contemporary fiction and some thrillers! As I stood here admiring the collection a woman approached me and introduced herself as the steward of this Little Free Library.

She shared how thrilled she was to a part of this sharing movement. The Little Free Library is based on the honor system encouraging anyone to take a book, leave a book. Not only does the Little Free Library encourage people to share their favorite stories, it also aims to build a sense of community and spark conversation.

Background on Little Free Libraries

When I returned home I did a little research on the history of Little Free Libraries. Todd Bol of Hudson, Wisconsin created little Free Libraries in 2009. They are built on a model of a one-room schoolhouse. It was a tribute to his mother; she was a teacher who loved to read. He filled the little library with books and put it on a post in his front yard. His neighbors and friends loved it. He built several more and gave them away. Each one had a sign that said FREE BOOKS. Rick Brooks of UW-Madison saw Bol’s do-it-yourself project while they were discussing potential social enterprises. Together, the two saw opportunities to achieve a variety of goals for the common good.

Their mission is: To promote literacy and the love of reading by building free book exchanges worldwide and to build a sense of community as we share skills, creativity, and wisdom across generations.

A Little Free Library is a “take a book, return a book” free book exchange. They come in many shapes and sizes, but the most common version is a small wooden box of As of June of 2016, there are 40,000 Libraries worldwide. With Little Free Library book exchanges in all 50 U.S. states and over 70 countries around the world. Approximately 60 percent of Little Free Library book exchanges have been built by stewards and 40 percent built and sold by Little Free Library (see their website for details).

Take a book. Return a book.

After reading the history, I was so taken by the concept of sharing and promoting literacy and reading that I used the online map feature at www.littlefreelibrary.org to find other libraries near my home in Atlanta and other locations around town. During the next several weeks, I drove around dropping off copies of my novel Free of Malice with a note inviting Little Free Library stewards to read my book and share their impressions on social media using the hashtags #FreeofMalice #LittleFreeLibrary. To honor the sharing concept, I’m donating a portion of my online book sales to the Little Free Library organization and local libraries. My story was recently featured in Creative Loafing Atlanta.

Connecting neighbors. Sharing good reads.

To take the concept of sharing to the next level, I’m inviting my social media network to participate as well. I’m giving away 10 copies of Free of Malice over the July 4th holiday to Little Free Library stewards and readers who connect with me over social media and who want to continue the cycle of sharing and caring. Tweet or email me at liz [at] lizlazarus [dot] com to indicate that you are interested in reading #FreeofMalice, and if inclined will share a review on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or Goodreads and most importantly that you will share the book with your local Little Free Library.

You can connect with me on Facebook at AuthorLizLazarus and Twitter and Instagram using @liz_lazarus. I’m also on Goodreads at Liz Lazarus to let me know that you are interested (or that you love Little Free Libraries). Use Hashtag #LFL and #freeofmalice.

Thank you for sharing, building community and sparking conversations.

Captivating: An Evening with Mary Kubica

Author Book Event – Atlanta, GA

I had the pleasure of hearing Mary Kubica speak at the Margaret Mitchell House in Atlanta, GA, as part of her Don’t You Cry book tour. I connected with her on Twitter, @MaryKubica, along with my friend and fellow author Chelsea Humphrey, @suspensethrill, so we were super excited to meet her in person.

I’ve heard many authors speak, reading excerpts from their book and sharing their story, but I have to say, Mary was one of the best! During her presentation, “captivating” was the word that kept coming to my mind.

Mary shared that she loved to write as a child, but never really considered a career as an author. Like most kids, she didn’t necessarily think about the person behind the book or the possibility of writing as a vocation. She became a high school history teacher until her first child was born. She then opted to stay home and raise her baby and began writing The Good Girl. As Mary described it, something about that book felt special, the characters spoke to her. As she spoke, I found myself nodding in agreement – I’ve often felt like I was watching a movie and taking dictation as I wrote Free of Malice.

It took her nearly five years and she wrote in secrecy – I can relate here as well. It was quite a leap to let my mother and fiancé read my book. Mary had no contacts in the publishing world (ditto!) so she looked up how to query agents and got a few bites. As she noted, it’s sometimes easier to share your work with strangers than friends.

Although there was some initial interest, she didn’t get any takers, so Mary shelved her book and went on with her life. Two years later, she received a letter from an agent who asked if her book was still available. This woman had read her book when it was first submitted and had since been promoted to a position to make a decision to move forward. This was in 2012 and Mary was offered a two-book deal, with the gentle nudge that it couldn’t take another five years for her next book, which was Pretty Baby.

When she embarked on her third novel, Mary described how the characters “fought her.” She felt like an outsider looking in and didn’t seem to find a natural flow. Given the success of her first two books, this one didn’t feel worthy of following in the same footsteps and was giving her a good deal of angst. Much to her relief, Mary’s editor didn’t want to move forward with the draft so she set it aside. With a blank canvas, she quickly started writing again and that became Don’t You Cry. With a deadline looming and limited time, Mary described how she would get up at 4:30 am to write and instead of editing along the way, she just kept moving forward to advance the story. From the rave reviews, it sounds like it was a smart plan. Hearing her story was such an inspiration—to learn that she had a two-year wait to be discovered and just experienced putting an entire book aside to quickly write a new one. Amazing!

There is a great deal of tenacity and heart in that petite body of hers and I’m so thrilled to have had the chance to learn more about her and her journey as an author! Thanks to the Margaret Mitchell House for making this event happen and to Mary for stopping by Atlanta on her book tour!